News aggregator

Capital One AGA Card Program Ending

AGA news - Sat, 28/06/2014 - 14:00

Capital One has informed its Card Lab Connect partners that it is ending the program, under which AGA members could apply for go-decorated VISA cards whose fees were shared with AGA, according to AGA President Andy Okun.  ”I am quite disappointed, as the program was a nice addition to the AGA budget and the cards a nice conversation piece,” he told the E-Journal. New applications are no longer being accepted, although spending on existing cards will generate revenue through the end of September.  After that the cards will be replaced with ordinary Capital One cards, which members may keep or cancel as they please.  The AGA will make good on its offer of a $50 cash rebate for New York Congress attendees showing the card. “We promised,” Okun said (U.S. Go Congress Registration Opens with Special Rebate Offer 3/30/2014). Capital One cited declining business in the wake of the 2008 financial crisis as reason for leaving the affinity card business.  There are a few similar other programs out there, but Okun said he would like feedback at president@usgo.org before deciding on whether to go down that path.

Categories: World news

EuroGoTV Update: United Kingdom, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Austria

AGA news - Sat, 28/06/2014 - 13:30

United Kingdom: The Welsh Open finished in Barmouth on June 22 with Alistair Wall 2d in first, Toby Manning 2d in second, and Christian Scarff 1d in third. Bosnia and Herzegovina: Also on June 22, Mijodrag Stankovic 5d dominated the 10th Open Zelenkovac. Mihailo Jacimovic 1d came in second and Daniel Zrno 2k in third. Austria: Ali Jabarin 6d (left) took the Wien 2014 Vienna International Tournament on June 22 while Cristian Pop 7d took second and Hui Fan 8d placed third.
– Annalia Linnan, based on reports from EuroGoTV, which include complete result tables and all the latest European go news; photo courtesy of EuroGoTV

Categories: World news

Go Stamp Collection on View This Weekend in St Louis

AGA news - Fri, 27/06/2014 - 23:45

If you’re in the St Louis area this weekend – or maybe just passing through the airport – you’ll want to stop by the stamp show at the Renaissance St. Louis Airport Hotel. Longtime go player and philatelist Les Lanphear will be showing his award-winning stamp exhibition “Go, The World’s Oldest Board Game,” which uses brilliantly-colored stamps from around the world to tell the story of go, from its’ origins through development of the game, the people involved, as well as various related historical developments, including go’s transmission to Japan, Europe and the United States. “The last time I showed the exhibit was around three years ago,” Lanphear tells the E-Journal. “About 50% has been changed with many new items.  I am getting it ready for an international exhibit on Korea in August.” The hours of the show are 10a to 6p Friday and Saturday and 10a to 4p Sunday.
photo: Lanphear at the 2008 US Go Congress in Portland, OR; photo by Chris Garlock.

Categories: World news

2014 WAGC Player Profiles: Europe (Part 2)

AGA news - Fri, 27/06/2014 - 23:30

Third in a series of profiles of players in the 35th World Amateur Go Championships, which will be held July 4-11 in Gyeongju, Korea.

Germany: Bernd Radmacher 4D (left), 42, lives in Meerbusch (near Düsseldorf, Cologne) where he’s “just looking after my children at the moment.” He’s been playing go for 25 years, placing second in the 2013 German Championship, and played in the 2008 WMSG amateur tournament in Beijing. He likes go’s “creativity and beauty, creating shapes on the board” and the game’s “magic, even for pros, who study it all their lives. It has surprises in every game.” Hobbies include other board games, and playing piano. Married, he has one daughter (18), and two sons (16, now 2-dan, and 13). 

Luxemburg:
Andreas Goetzfried 4D (right) is a 24-year-old student in the capital city of Luxemburg. He’s been playing for 10 years and like go because of “Its rather simple rules compared to its very complex structure.”

Netherlands: Merlijn Kuin 6D (left) is a 32-year-old Program Manager/Project Leader in Amsterdam who’s been playing go since he was 15. He’s been Dutch Go Champion “many times” and was part of the 2011 European Team Champion team. His favorite thing about go is that “It’s near infinite possibilities allows one to be creative and come up with new and surprising high level strategies to slowly but inexorably move towards control of the game and then give the game away during byo-yomi endgame.” He suggests “reinstat(ing) decent thinking time in the WAGC or should we change the name to WA Rapid GC?” His hobbies include reading, studying go strategy or teaching go and playing other strategy games and he enjoys “Teasing people in a hopefully fun way (for example by filling out online forms unconventionally)” In response to our query about non-go accomplishments he said “I’ve got a job. How much time do you guys think I have, next to becoming and staying 6d?”

Norway: Oeystein Vestgaarden 2D (right) is a 35-year-old project manager for digital learning software in Oslo. He won the Oslo Open in 2012 and 2013 and was the Norwegian participant in the 28th WAGC in 2007 and the 31st WAGC in 2010. He’s been playing since he was 19 and likes “The simplicity of the rules combined with being infinitely difficult to master. Go has a certain beauty that no other board games can match. On the more practical side, I like that the game is equally enjoyable in both silent ‘study-like’ environments and more relaxed environments like a café or pub.” For hobbies, “I sing in a choir, play the bass in a band, play football, indoor climbing, reading, mountain hiking.” Other accomplishments include working as an editor in a publishing company for seven years.

Poland: Stanisław Frejlak 4D (left) is an 18-year-old student in Warsaw. He’s been playing since the age of 6 and was Polish Youth Go Champion Under 16 in 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, and 2011, Under 18 champion in 2010 and Polish Go Champion in 2012. “My favorite thing in go is the exciting fights between big groups on which a game’s result depends.” Hobbies include maths and he was Laureate of Polish Mathematical Olympiad (2013, 2014) and took 3rd place with the Polish Team on “The Baltic Way mathematical contest” (2013).

Romania: Lucian Corlan 5D (right) says go is “A many-splendored thing.” His hobbies include reading, basketball and tennis. The 34-year-old software engineer hails from Bucuresti.

Serbia: Nikola Mitic 6D (left) is a 22-year-old student from Nis. He won the 2013 Serbian Championship and the 2014 Serbian Cup. He started playing at the age of 6 and likes “Fighting on the board, meeting people off the board.” Hobbies include reading, basketball, football, and video games.

Slovakia: Peter Jadron 4D (right) is a 33-year-old psychiatrist who currently lives in Karlstadt, Germany. He’s been playing for about 20 years and was the Slovakian Champion in 2008. “I like the fact, that only a well balanced combination of intuition, creativity, flexibility, knowledge and deep reading leads to success in the game of go,” he says. He’s married and has two children. Hobbies include cycling, nature, photography, classical music, composing and medicine.

Slovenia: Timotej Suc 3D (left) is a 30-year-old EM physician in Ljubljana. “I like complex battles,” he says, adding that “Because of go I have traveled many places in Europe and also elsewhere.” He’s been playing for 15 years and achievements include 1st place in the 50th Ljubljana Open in 2011, Slovenian team champion with the Ljubljana Go club  from 2005-2013,  Balkan student champion in 2007,  1st place in the 2005 Rijeka Open, 2nd place in the Slovenian championship in 2008 and 2012, and  3rd place in the Slovenian championship in 2010,’11 and ’13. He’s married and has three children (5y, 3y, 6m) and his hobbies include playing football.

Spain: Pau Carles 3D (right) is a 37-year-old salesman from Barcelona. Winner of the Spanish Go Championship in 2008, his favorite thing about go is “The friendship environment.”

Switzerland: Sylvain Praz 1k (left) is a 27-year-old history student who lives in Lausanne. He’s been playing go five years and his hobbies include reading, seeing friends and having a drink. His favorite thing about go is “When, during a game, anything else stops existing.”

Ukraine: Bogdan Zhurakovskyi 5D is a 26-year-old data analyst from Kyiv who holds a Phd in Statistics. He’s been playing since he was 11, and was the 2005 European youth vice-champion the 2008 Ukrainian champion and 2014 Ukrainian vice-champion. His favorite thing about the game is its “Mix of complexity and simplicity.”

United Kingdom (England): Francis Roads 1D (though he notes “formerly 4 dan”) is a Retired Music Education Advisor who lives in London. Roads (left) learned to play at 22, has been playing for 49 years and his titles are “Too many to count.” His favorite thing about go is “The people that you meet.” Hobbies include West Gallery Church Music and he currently serves as Honorary Secretary of the West Gallery Music Association, and Music Director of London Gallery Quire. He retired as Head of Music Curriculum Support for Essex County Council. “My selection as British representative to the 2014 WAGC results from the points system in our Challengers League, which rewards persistence as well as competence,” he notes.

Missing (we hope to include in a future edition): Azerbaijan, Denmark, Portugal, Russia, Sweden.

Categories: World news

Chilean Tourney Draws 40 Kids

AGA news - Fri, 27/06/2014 - 23:00

“Forty children between the ages of five and sixteen competed at the first inter-school go tournament, in Punta Arenas, Chile, on Saturday June 6th,” reports organizer Sebastian Montiel.  “Three categories were played depending on the experience of the participants: 13×13, 9×9 and Atari-Go.” The tourney was held at Colegio Luterano, with five schools competing, and was organized by the Aonken Go Club.  First place winner in the 13×13, Matias Salinas, age 13, writes “I would like Punta Arenas to become world famous in the world of go, and for people from other countries to travel to this city just to play go.” Aonken Go Club, which joined the Chilean Go Federation as an official club in 2013, has been promoting Go in Punta Arenas vigorously.  Aonken, another name for the  indigenous language of Tehuelche, means south. “This name represents our geographical location in the world and pays tribute to the original people of our land,” according to the Aonken Go Club Website, which can be seen here, or translated into English, here.

Winner’s Report: 13×13 Category: First place: Matías Salinas, Colegio Luterano; Second place: Elian Velasquez, Colegio Luterano; Third place: Benjamin Mimiza, Colegio Luterano; Fighting Spirit: Manuel Acuña, Colegio Luterano. 9×9 Category: First place: Anastasia Sanhueza, Escuela J. Williams; Second place: Maria Trinidad Villanueva, Colegio Luterano; Third place: Joaquín Oyarzo, Contardi; Fighting Spirit: Bastían Zuñiga, Colegio Luterano.  Atari-Go Category: First place: Francisco Jerez, Colegio Luterano; Second place: Benjamin Leiva, Escuela Juan Williams; Third place: Belen, Escuela Juan Williams; Fighting Spirit: Tiare Santana, Colegio Luterano. -Paul Barchilon, E-J Youth Editor. Photo by Jose Fernandez.

Categories: World news

James and the Dragon

Irish Go Association - Fri, 27/06/2014 - 22:02

The winner of the Intermediate section of the 2014 Irish Correspondence Championship has been decided tonight. James Aitken, who plays at Belfast Go Club, came out on top. He scored 8 wins out of 9, losing only to Julia Bohle, who seemed to grow in strength as the championship progressed. In second place was Kevin Doherty, from Galway. Not all games have been finished in the competition yet, but the top places are no longer in doubt.

In other news, the Belfast Go Club are sitting on top of the BGA’s online league. Their team, comprising Karl Irwin, James Hutchinson, and Tiberiu Gociu has shown keen spirit to get as many games played as possible. (Not always an easy task!) Their current scoreline of 12-2 seems to place them in an commanding position.

Categories: World news

Your Move/Readers Write: Danish-German WAGC Mix-Up

AGA news - Fri, 27/06/2014 - 17:00

“Firstly let me appreciate all the work with the journal,” writes Michael Marz. “I really enjoy it. This time (2014 WAGC Player Profiles: Europe (Part 1) 6/26 EJ), however, there is a mistake.  The German representative is Bernd Radmacher, who is also the person in the picture. The guy mentioned, Arne Ohlenbusch, is half German and half Danish, I assume he is the Danish representative.”
Excellent catch! Our apologies for the mix-up; Ohlenbusch is indeed the Danish rep (he lives in Germany, which was what confused us). We’ve corrected the original report and included German rep Bernd Radmacher in today’s player profile preview. 

Categories: World news

EWGC 2014

Euro Go TV - Fri, 27/06/2014 - 14:17
Author: EuroGoTV-Russia on 14:44 Wed 25 June 2014

High School Team Grand Prix `Alma mater`, stage 3 25-2014

Euro Go TV - Fri, 27/06/2014 - 14:17
Author: Newsbot on 15:44 Sun 22 June 2014

Go Seigen Memorial 25-2014

Euro Go TV - Fri, 27/06/2014 - 14:17
Author: Newsbot on 15:55 Mon 16 June 2014

Half-Price Go Book Sale at Yutopian

AGA news - Fri, 27/06/2014 - 14:00

Yutopian is offering a half-price sale on dozens of go books. Through July 31, the Go Books Summer Sale offers the second book half off of the original price when you buy one at the original price. You must call or email to get the deal, though: 1-800-988-6463 or info@yutopian.com

Categories: World news

Su & Cha Top Davis-Sacramento Summer Tourney

AGA news - Fri, 27/06/2014 - 01:22

The June 21 Davis/Sacramento Summer Quarterly Tournament at the Arcade Library in Sacramento drew a field of nine players from the Bay Area to the Sierra foothills. Charles Su 1k (left) won the upper division and Tai-An Cha 5k, won the lower division.
- report/photo by Willard Haynes

Categories: World news

Half Off on Go Seigen Books at Slate & Shell

AGA news - Fri, 27/06/2014 - 01:19

Slate & Shell is having a half-price sale on all four of John Fairbairn’s books on Go Seigen to commemorate the master’s 100th birthday. There are four of them: Kamakura, 9 Dan Showdown, Final Summit, and Old Fuseki vs New Fuseki. “They make for a rather complete biography of Go and contain commentaries on many of his most famous games,” says S&S’ Bill Cobb. Get all four (the Go Seigen Birthday Pack) for $45.00, and they can also be bought individually.

Categories: World news

2014 WAGC Player Profiles: Europe (Part 1)

AGA news - Thu, 26/06/2014 - 23:59

Second in a series of profiles of players in the 35th World Amateur Go Championships, which will be held July 4-11 in Gyeongju, Korea. Fifty-seven players from a like number of countries and territories are scheduled to make the trip to Korea to compete in the four-day, eight-round Swiss system. Many will be veterans of previous tournaments held in Japan and China, some drawn back to WAGC competition after a long absence, perhaps by the chance to be part of the first WAGC held in Korea. As usual, the largest contingent will come from Europe (30 players) and the youngest from the Far East (15 players, including an 11-year-old from Indonesia). Click here for Ranka’s June 24 WAGC preview.

Austria: Matthias Frisch 1D, 21 (right), is a student and works in a hotel in Vienna. He first started playing five years ago “but I quit very fast and then I got interested in it again about three years ago.” His favorite thing about go is “not the game itself, but rather the people you meet.”  Hobbies include soccer and snowboarding; “I like to do many things if there is enough time besides my studies.”

Belarus: Aliaksandr Suponeu 1D (left) is a 64-year-old engineer who’s been playing go for 30 years. Winner of the Belarusian Championship, this will be his eighth World Go Championship.

Belgium: Dominique Versyck 2D (right) is a 31-year-old accountant in Lennik. He’s been playing for 9 years and says that “Each game is different, there is no luck involved, go is simply perfect!” His hobbies include chess and quizzes. He’s married, with a 2-year old son, and a daughter due at the end of October.

Bulgaria: Teodor Nedev 3k (left) is a 44-year-old teacher in Ruse. He’s been playing 10 years and won the 2013 Open Championship in Bulgaria (Pomorie). Go is “a representation of the Universe,” he says. Hobbies include reading books and extreme sports: he’s a master in martial arts (Chinese, Japanese, Korean, Russian, Philippines), chess (International, Chinese, Japanese), healing arts and yoga.

Croatia: Zoran Mutabžija 5D (right) is a 69-year-old retiree. He’s been playing go for 49 years, winning the 1967 European Championship, 1st place in the 1971 European Championship, and was a first-place winner in the Croatian Championship many times. Hobbies include programming and his favorite thing about go is “Seeing places and people at tournaments.” He’s married and his children now run his web hosting company.

Czech Republic: Lukas Podpera 6D (left) is a 19-year-old student in Prague who’s been playing since he was 7 years old. His favorite thing about go is its “huge number of variations and creativity” and his hobbies include soccer, cycling and music.

Denmark: Arne Ohlenbusch 4D (right) is a 23-year-old postman in Oldenburg. He’s been playing for 10 years and his favorite thing about go is that there’s “basically no luck involved and you can use unlimited much time getting better.” Hobbies include soccer and pc games.

Finland: Juuso Nyyssönen 5D (left) is a 21-year-old student from Helsinki. He won the 2013 Finnish Championship. “Every game brings new surprises,” he says, “even though I’ve played thousands of games by now.”

France: Antoine Fenech 5D (right) is a 28-year-old mathematics teacher in Strasbourg. Titles include the 1996 and 1997 Under 12 European Youth Championship, the 2003 Under 18 European Youth Championship under 18  and the 2013 French Pair Go Championship. His favorite thing about go is “Travelling around the world and meeting people from different cultures.” Hobbies include soccer.

Ireland: John Gibson 4k (left) is a 65-year-old interior designer who lives in Dublin. He’s been playing since his early 20′s, won the 1992 Irish Handicap Championship and says that go is “Such a satisfying game. Great also for travelling and meeting new people wherever one goes.” He’s married and has three daughters, including one, Naomi, who won the Irish Ladies Go Championship in 1992 “but has not been active recently.” Hobbies include chess, Jamble, Pits, and tennis.

Italy: Niccolò Sgaravatti 2k (right) is a 24-year-old IT Developer in Padova. “This game is a constant challenge to see the reality of things,” he says. He enjoys “walking the hills, reading sages about anthropology, bronze age, biology and so on.”

Lithuania: Andrius Petrauskas 3D (left) is 39-year-old manager in Vilnius. He’s been playing since the age of 12 and has been Lithuanian champion several times. His favorite thing about go is that it’s an “Interesting, deep game.”
Tomorrow: Europe, Part 2.

Categories: World news

Your Move/Readers Write: Nauseating Profiles; Clarifying Calculated Mistakes

AGA news - Thu, 26/06/2014 - 17:51

Nauseating Profiles: “Reading the journal is part of my morning routine,” writes Chris Uzal. “Most of the time it is interesting, sometimes it’s not. Can’t win them all, of course. One of your articles today crossed over into the nauseous zone. This morning’s article about “player profiles” (2014 WAGC Player Profiles: Asia 6/24 EJ) is easily among the dumbest stories I’ve ever read. You want to inspire kids to play go? Articles like this is certainly not how you do it.”
Sorry you didn’t like the profiles; our intention is simply to introduce EJ readers to the players who will be competing at the upcoming WAGC, which we’ll be covering in greater depth starting at the end of next week. Thanks for taking the time to respond!

Clarifying Calculated Mistakes: “Just a quick reply to Michael Redmond’s comments on the Chess Life article!” (Michael Redmond 9P on “Calculated Errors” 6/24 EJ) writes Ed Scimia of About Chess. “I’m a lifelong chess player, and I can clarify a couple things that Michael brought up in his commentary. His concept of ‘calculated mistakes’ does exist in chess endgames as well: it is, of course, much easier for humans to play simplifying moves to reach an endgame situation they are certain is a win than to play the ‘perfect’ line according to a computer or deep human analysis (which may be much more complex and therefore tactically dangerous). In chess, nobody would consider those “sub-optimal” moves to be errors either, as long as they clearly lead to a win. In these situations, though, a player would be said to be winning by much more than a half-pawn. That advantage is enough to say that one player’s position is slightly better, but not enough to be certain they can actually win with best play from both sides (remember that in chess, a draw is a common and natural outcome for many games). I hope that helps!”

Categories: World news

Slovak Go Festival 25-2014

Euro Go TV - Wed, 25/06/2014 - 10:17
Author: Newsbot on 15:55 Mon 16 June 2014

Club Tournament 24-2014

Euro Go TV - Wed, 25/06/2014 - 10:17
Author: Newsbot on 15:13 Sun 15 June 2014

Open Lisboa 2014

Euro Go TV - Wed, 25/06/2014 - 10:17
Author: Newsbot on 15:15 Thu 12 June 2014

Michael Redmond 9P on “Calculated Errors”

AGA news - Wed, 25/06/2014 - 04:24

“The Chess Life article (Your Move/Readers Write: ‘Catching Chess Cheaters’ 6/23 EJ) says that ‘One interesting statistic is that players make 60 percent to 90 percent more errors when half a pawn ahead or behind compared to when the game is even,’” writes Michael Redmond 9P.

“How would you compare half a pawn in chess to a point advantage in go? I don’t know how big an advantage that is for chess masters, but I think that Regan’s observation that the players’ assessment of a game position — and the assumed emotional value — is affecting their ability to think is also true of go players, but to a lesser extent, depending on how big a half pawn is.”

“The article seems to imply that while the player at a disadvantage might have reason to play a high-risk/high-reward move, the winning player must try to play the correct move always. He uses this reasoning to conclude that the players are actually making errors. I suppose that chess, being a race to kill, does not allow for calculated mistakes, but this seems to be less true of go, and could indicate a difference in the endgame stage of the two games.”

“In go, there can be calculated ‘errors’ by the player with an advantage. As a go game nears its end, the leading player can often calculate a win without playing the optimum moves. My opinion is that top go players will sometimes choose technically incorrect moves when 2.5 points ahead, a calculated choice to simplify the game. Such calculated ’mistakes’ by the winning player are usually minor, and two to three mistakes can add up to a one point loss in actual play when compared to the correct endgame sequence. Anything more than that is probably a ‘real’ mistake.”
photo: Redmond at the 2010 WAGC; photo by John Pinkerton

Categories: World news

2014 WAGC Player Profiles: Asia

AGA news - Wed, 25/06/2014 - 03:34

First in a series of profiles of players in the 35th World Amateur Go Championships, which will be held July 4-11 in Gyeongju, Korea. The American Go E-Journal will once again be teaming up with Ranka  to provide comprehensive daily coverage of this major amateur tournament featuring top players from 74 countries and territories around the world. These are the players from Asia; missing are China, Indonesia, Korea, Macau, Mongolia, Vietnam; we hope to have their profiles in a future post. 

Brunei: Ho Soon Ang 2k (right) is a 24-year-old student who’s been playing for three years. His favorite thing about go is “Meeting new play style” and hobbies include badminton and PC games.

Hong Kong: Nai San Chan 6D (left) is a 21-year-old student at the Polytechnic University of Hong Kong. He’s been playing go since he was 6 and won the HK Go Open (2005-2010, 2013) was WAGC 2nd runner up (2009) and WAGC 3rd runner up (2008,2010). His favorite thing about go is “Fighting.” Hobbies include ball games.

Indonesia: Rafif Shidqi Fitrah 4D (right) is an 11-year-old elementary school student in Bandung. He started playing at age 7and says his favorite thing about go is “Attacking each other.” He was the runner up at the 2013 Japan Minister of Education, Culture, Sports, Science Cup Elementary School Team Competition as part of a team consisting of Rafif and Rafif’s two little brothers, Faishal Umar and Faiz Utsman. His hobbies include reading books.

Japan: Kikou Emura 7D (left) is a 34-year-old graduate school student in Hyogo. He’s been playing since the age of four, and has won the 2006 sekaigakuseiouzasen, and the the 2012 and 2013 sekaiamaigosenshuken. He likes that “go is deep” and hobbies include mah-jongg and karaoke.

Malaysia: Suzanne D’Bel 3D (right) is a 24-year-old programmer living in Itabashi, Japan. She’s been playing since the age of 14 and says that “The broadness of the game means that go can be mixed with many interesting fields such as art and design, technologies, music, medical etc.” She also says the game is great for “Making new friends and partners!” Hobbies include traveling around to play go, crafting with electronics, mixture of art and technology, anime.

Nepal: Narendra Sowal 1D (left) is a 28-year-old small businessman in Bhaktapur. He’s been playing for 16 years and won the Nepal Go Championship in 2000, 2001, 2002 and 2014. Long term thinking is his favorite thing about go. He’s married with one son.

Singapore: Jia Cheng Tan 6D (right) is a 29-year-old engineer who’s been playing since he was 6. His favorite thing about go is “The calculation involved and requirement to play with an open mind to adapt to changes.”

Taipei: Yi-Tien Chan 7D (left) is a 21-year-old student from Changhua. He’s been playing since the age of 7 and loves the “Self challenge” of the game.

Thailand: Thanapol Tiawattananont 4D (right) is a 23-year-old student. He’s been playing since the age of 10 and says that go is “an art of life and a way of life. It’s a philosophy of life. And it makes friends all over the world!” Hobbies include soccer, table-tennis, travelling and bird-watching.

Categories: World news
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