May 2010

There are many tournament systems that can be used in place of McMahon. Some of them are listed here, in approximate order of usefulness. You may use any that you like; but if you have no strong preferences, we recommend that you just use McMahon. If you use a system other than McMahon, then this must be published in the literature.





Last updated Sun Jun 06 2010. If you have any comments, please email the webmaster on web-master AT britgo DOT org.

This chapter provides guidelines for people who have undertaken the responsibility of producing the pairing for a tournament. Although a draw can be produced manually, it is now usual to use a computer.





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4.1 Overview

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p>Most British Go tournaments use the McMahon system, which is designed to ensure that games in a tournament are most likely to be even. Each player in the tournament starts off with a McMahon score (or "MMS") that corresponds to his grade. For example, a 4-kyu player starts





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This chapter covers the running of a tournament on the day itself. Much of the work happens on the day, and it is therefore useful to find some local players who are willing to help with various tasks outlined below.





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We organise the British Open, the London Open, and the British Championship cycle. All other British Go tournaments are the responsibility of clubs, or more rarely individuals. This section covers the advance planning needed to run a successful tournament .





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1 Overview

This document is intended to be a standard source of information on organising Go tournaments. It is aimed mainly at British readers, but is intended to be much more widely applicable.





Last updated Tue May 28 2013. If you have any comments, please email the webmaster on web-master AT britgo DOT org.

Most established clubs hold weekly (or less frequent) meetings, with the main purpose of playing games. A regular feature should of course be the playing of teaching games against weaker players. Apart from this, several kinds of events designed for teaching have been tried. The following sections describe several ideas (by no means exhaustive).





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5.1 Club Ladder

A club ladder provides a format for playing relatively serious handicap games with automatically adjusting grades. It also enables a go club to establish the relative grades of its members and to monitor their progress.





Last updated Tue Dec 18 2012. If you have any comments, please email the webmaster on web-master AT britgo DOT org.

How you teach the rules of Go to beginners will depend on

  • How many learners there are
  • Whether they are children or adults
  • What resources you have





Last updated Tue Nov 08 2011. If you have any comments, please email the webmaster on web-master AT britgo DOT org.

Few Go clubs could survive without publicity. Every member of a club was once not a member, found about about the club somehow, and joined. If you want your club to survive, you will need to recruit new members.





Last updated Tue Nov 08 2011. If you have any comments, please email the webmaster on web-master AT britgo DOT org.